Bush, McCain Call for End to Moratorium on Terrible Ideas

by Jordan Zakarin

In a speech Wednesday in the White House Rose Garden, President Bush joined John McCain in requesting Congress lift the 27-year old ban on terrible ideas as the two work to promote a number of horrific non-solutions to the nation’s energy crisis.

“I agree with Senator McCain that the only way we can address these skyrocketing fuel prices is by doing what we do best,” Bush said, “which requires maximum leeway in crafting, promoting and implementing idiotic, senseless policies that will do little if anything to help the American people while causing further damage to our environment and economy. As such, I’m asking Congress to make sure we have the greatest opportunity to do so.”

Bush’s call for terrible ideas was prefaced with his statement of support for John McCain’s assertion that the United States should begin “environmentally safe oil drilling” in waters close to major tourist hot spots and nature reserves. Bush snickered at the silliness of his friend’s idea from the podium, as reporters noted that not only would the oxymoronically-termed drilling undoubtedly pollute valuable vacation beaches and poison already endangered sea life, most estimates say that it would be over twenty years before any significant impact in oil production or prices was felt.

When the questioning was over, Bush chimed in, making sure reporters “don’t forget that it would do nothing to further the cause of alternative energy research or have any sort of impact in the fight against global warming,” which is believed to be caused by carbon emissions, mostly from burning oil. He also was quick to point out that the main beneficiaries of the idea would be already flourishing oil companies. “So let’s not shortchange this idea.”

Beyond the preposterous oil drilling proposal, Bush said he had a number of other “real winners sitting in the back of the ol noggin, waiting for their chance before I mosey back down to Texas this winter.”

Among his most favoritest, Bush said, was further deregulation of the mortgage industry, targeted tax cuts to hedge fund managers, coining quarters and dimes from mercury and plutonium, bar codes on squirrels,  and a restriction on apple juice sales to illegal immigrants. Asked to justify his proposal for further deregulation of the mortgage industry, the President insisted that he believed that, “those people function best without the man breathing down their neck. That’s when they can be creative and really solve problems.”

In a joint response suggesting that the President had never allowed the wishes of Congress to stop him before, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that “The Iraq War, tax cuts for the rich and No Child Left Behind have proven that the President took little heed,” in what the legislative branch had to say.

Not entirely true, Bush replied.

“It’s true that in my first six years, I had a bit of a looser leash, and look, we got a lot of things done, everything we wanted to accomplish. Now, thanks to the obstructionist tactics of this Democratic Congress, the past year and a half has seen precious little progress on a number of our top priorities. This is simply a way to remedy that situation and get started again with our big, shitty plans.”

Not to be overshadowed by the man he is trying to replace, McCain went one further in his plans to come to a horrible solution to the energy crisis, calling on the United States to create 100 new nuclear power plants in the coming years. “Why not?,” McCain said. “I was there in Nagasaki, that shit was awesome. No downside.”

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